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Woodcote

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woodcote

638 posts

Wow! That’s a fabulous layout Poppa - some of my favourite cars in there too :-)

 

More photos please!

woodcote

638 posts

Hi Ian - welcome to the forum!

 

If you have the ‘C’ code number - should be on the box somewhere - then Google that + ‘instructions’ and look in the images tab. That’s where I’d expect to find them if they are out there. I don’t know of any sites that hold a catalogue of Scalextric set instructions.

 

Hope that helps.

woodcote

638 posts

Hi Kirby - welcome to the forum!

 

That sounds unusual behaviour for the app on an iPad. I have seen something similar and a fresh install from the AppStore solved the problem. That might be worth a try.

 

The ARC app is designed to generate a pit stop after 10 laps and you’ll need to pit before 12 laps or suffer the consequences... There is no way to adjust that. The third-party Magic app does offer a few more features and more customisation. You might want to give it a trial: https://www.magicstudio.eu/index.php/games/arcapp

woodcote

638 posts

Hi Barry. That'll be what's known as a 'ferrite man' - an orange capacitor for a head and wire legs, going through a black ferrite ceramic filter. They filter out electrical interference and are particularly important on digital cars to help prevent glitches with the chip, like run-aways. The older chips, like in the Audi TT, are susceptible to such things...

 

You can buy the components at Pendle Slot Racing in the UK - they have packs of ten W8424 Scalextric Ferrite Ceramics Filters, plus packs of ten Pioneer 10nF Capacitors (WR200315). You'll have enough for ten ferrite men for about £10, including postage.

 

Then it's a case of very carefully soldering the wires to the chip onto the 'shoulders' of the man - the top of the 'legs' just under the orange 'head'. Make sure the two sides do not touch. Then slip on the ferrite filter 'body' over the legs and solder the ends of the legs to the pick-up / guide blade assembly. There should be another ferrite man on the motor you can copy. If not, one needs adding there too.

 

There is a superb tutorial by GregK here: https://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=69733

 

Most Scalextric cars do have ferrite men on both motor and guide, but some do not. Other brands of cars may have just a capacitor on the motor, but a full ferrite man is best fitted front and back. Thankfully, the C7005 and C7006 retro-fit chips have them factory fitted on the guide end, but not on the motor wires.

 

I hope that helps.

woodcote

638 posts

Track Designer was released on Windows XP and is glitchy on Vista and above. Indeed, it wasn't that great on XP...  It hasn't been available from the Scalextric website for ages and neither is it supported by Scalextric, so is missing the more recent digital (and some analogue) track pieces.

 

There are some very good track design programs out there - including free trial versions. Many like Ultimate Racer. I like AnyRail. The free version of Ultimate Racer is limited to saving tracks of 25 pieces - the unlimited Layout Editor version is a very reasonable 15 Euros. The free trial version on AnyRail is limited to 50 track pieces. The advantage of both is that they have ongoing support, with up-to-date track libraries. There is also RailModeller for Macs - the Express version is free and limited to 50 track pieces.

 

I hope that helps.

woodcote

638 posts

Hi marccharris - welcome to the forum!

 

Wow, that’s quite an expansion pack :-) And yes, it’s Sport track so is compatible with your ARC One Ultimate Rivals set.

 

The only things that aren’t directly compatible are the power bases, transformers and controllers - these are the older analogue system. Either you set up a track with the ARC One powerbase, transformer and controllers or the older version. Don’t mix the two in the same layout.

 

Something to consider in the future... If you really like the older powerbase and controllers, but can’t do without the excellent ARC app, there is a modification to use the older powerbase for power and the ARC One powerbase for lap timing: https://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=77744

 

I hope that helps.

woodcote

638 posts

Hi Racer Steve - welcome to the forum!

 

The two terminals at the front of the big black transformer should have nuts on them that unscrew. Simply unscrew them and then slide one copper connector (with the hole inside) from each controller onto each terminal. Keep the same colour wire together - white or red. Replace the nuts and tighten them up.

 

Each controller also has a red plastic connector with two copper pins. This goes underneath the track where there are square holes in the plastic so the copper pins fit. If you put the red connectors the same way round on each lane, the cars should run in the same direction. To change direction, just flip the red connectors round 180-degrees.

 

I hope that helps you get the set working.

woodcote

638 posts

Hi Thomas. I run ARC Pro on a twenty-eight foot track. I don’t have any jumpers, but all the track tabs are tightened and I use Inox as a rail conditioner. I really like being able to run digital cars in digital mode and analogue cars in analogue mode at a flick of a switch. I have a couple of curved lane changers from a very old digital set, but have decided not to use either of them. I am very happy with the ARC Pro set-up I have - which is running ARC Pro with components it was designed to work with.

 

I guess my question is whether your layout is long enough to need jumpers and whether you 100% absolutely must include the curved lane changers? If you do, look at a set-up that is as simple as possible and meets your needs. Jumpers are relatively easy - they need to be made as for an analogue layout, the same rail to the same rail. Ready-made power jumper cables are available, if that would be helpful. Google ‘Scalextric power jumper cable’. These will need fitting to two track pieces (same rail to same rail), but no soldering is required.

 

There are several relatively complex options for the curved lane changers, some designed for digital-only layouts. If you want both digital and analogue, I would consider the option of omitting them altogether - as I did. If you are planning on doing a mod yourself and you don’t understand it, I wouldn’t do it.  I’m sure that would also be the advice of Scalextric - they have designed ARC Pro to work in a certain way, which does not include compatibility with track pieces that have been obsolete for nearly ten years. Reading back over old digital threads on other forums, curved lane changers were never liked that much, which is interesting...

woodcote

638 posts

The third part of my review is looking at compatibility. And I'll start by saying that the new track system is 100% not compatible with the old track. The new sets also run on half the voltage of the old sets - 9V compared to 18V. However, there is some cross-over potential between the two systems. What I've written below is partly theoretical, but mostly based on a few things I tested last month.

 

Without any modifications, the differences mean that the old cars will run slowly on the new sets and the new cars will be ridiculously fast and twitchy on the old track at anything beyond half throttle (and the motors may well burn out). For other brands of HO car, their solid shoes do not work with the flat rails of the new track. I did run an AutoWorld car that I'd soldered braid to the bottom of the shoes - it ran fine, but slow (due to the 9 volts).

 

I did think that plugging in an old Micro Scalextric power supply to the track (to give 18V) would mean old Micro cars and other brands (with braids soldered on) would run - that seemed a simple fix. However, Hornby have very sensibly altered the power plug so that this can't be done - only the 9V power supply fits the new powerbase.

 

So here are a few fixes that have come up in discussions with US HO enthusiasts. However, I must stress that all these are options for dedicated slot car enthusiasts who have some electronics and car-building skills. And we can't test them until those first sets arrive in May...

 

1. Multi-voltage layout. The simplest option is to use a variable voltage power supply that gives settings at 9V, 12V and 18V or a fully-adjustable bench-top power supply that gives options everywhere from around 0 to 20V. The easy option is to connect the new 9V lead and plug to the adjustable power supply. An advanced-enthusiast system would be to build a custom power track and driver stations that would allow controller upgrades, a brake circuit, relays controlling track power etc etc. That would be the ultimate HO system and I think the new track is ideal for that.

 

2. Adding braid to other brands of HO cars. With adjustable voltage, the old Micro cars will work fine. Other brands would need either braids soldered to their solid shoes or an HORacePro Slide Guide installed. The Slide Guide acts as a miniature Scalextric guide and is designed for HO cars running on 1/32 scale track. There is also a 'Standard Track' Slide Guide that is designed for the narrower slot in HO track - I think this would be ideal for the new Micro track. I shall be getting some Slide Guides from the US to test them in May.

 

3. Using a replacement chassis. Using adjustable voltage doesn't solve the issue of racing 9V cars against 18V cars. However, there is a perfect solution to running other cars on 9V on the new track - the SL2 3D-printed chassis available from Shapeways. This isn't an out-of-the-box option, it has to be built and components (braid, axles, wheels, tyres, motor, gears, traction magnets) have to be sourced. So neither is it cheap. However, using the motor (and axles, gears, wheels and tyres) from the new Micro Scalextric chassis, you will have a car with almost identical performance at 9V to the new Micro Scalextric cars. Available for the SL2 chassis are body clips to fit numerous brands of HO bodies - Micro Scalextric (1994-2018); most AFX/AutoWorld/Tomy standard wheelbase cars (1970s-2019); Tyco/Mattel wide and narrow (1970s-2019); AutoWorld Super III; Tomy Mega-G and Mega-G+ longwheelbase. Plus more to come... What I will aim to do is build two (and eventually four) SL2 chassis so I can race any of my HO bodies against each other on the new track and also against new Micro Scalextric cars.

 

4. Using new cars on existing HO track. This would mean dialing down the power to 9V or swapping out the motor for a new one that works at 18V. The Tomy Mega-G+ cars have a similar N20 motor that was custom-made to work at 18V - unfortunately these are not readily available. Some of us would very much like to run the new cars as a school holiday race series at our club - we'd continue to use our four-lane AFX track set-up, but reduce the track voltage to 9V.

 

I hope that gives people food for thought. If you have any other ideas, do share them here.

woodcote

638 posts

Hi luanvanviet - welcome to the forum!

 

I would suggest contacting Scalextric Car Restorations in the UK. They offer a repair service and stock a vast range of parts for the older cars.

 

I hope that helps and you get the Jag back on track.

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