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SArc Pro and Wireless Controllers

Cmokem

6 posts

Hello everyone.  Have a question regarding an Arc Pro System with wireless controllers.  It seems that the cars will not roll out when you let your finger off the controller but rather brake.  How do I get the cars to roll when I release the trigger of the wireless controller??

 

Would appreciate any help

Thanks in advance 

Bob

Andy P.

1635 posts


Community Moderator

That is very odd because both ARC PRO and ARC AIR have a brake button. Letting the trigger go should let them roll. You have to use the brake to make the car stop and to invoke pitting.

Are these standard Scalextric cars or ones that have had their gearing changed?

Changing the gearing, for example putting a larger crown gear on will increase accelration and braking.

Dr_C

288 posts

I think the answer to the question is that the current firmware in ARC PRO controllers always operates with dynamic braking whereby the brakes are applied whenever the throttle is released. The brakes are also applied when the brake button is pressed.

 

I believe there is no way to manually turn off dynamic braking at present when using ARC PRO controllers with the ARC PRO Powerbase. I hope at some point Hornby will release firmware upgrades which enable this feature to be turned off as was possible with earlier wired powerbases.

 

C

Cmokem

6 posts

Yes these are the cars that camewith the platinium set Andy.  Dr. C are there any other options, perhaps a different controller...or powerbase.  This is really annoying when we are racing.

 

Thank You for the repliesCool

Bob

Dr_C

288 posts

There are other options in terms of powerbases (e.g. the APB C7042) but this uses wired controllers as standard... so nothing as straightforward to setup with wireless controllers as ARC PRO... in addition there are more advanced wireless options but all significantly more complex to set up and expensive...

 

Assuming you stay with ARC PRO... then there are a few possibilities...

 

1/ we ask Hornby to add the feature of switching off dynamic braking by updating the app and updating any necessary firmware... including perhaps the throttle controller firmware.

 

2/ there is a potential modification to the controllers where a resistor is added so that the controller registers a throttle value of 1 rather than 0 when the throttle trigger is released. This would avoid the dynamic braking taking effect... but it would have the down side in that a small motor current would pass through the motor even when the throttle is released... not ideal but probably ok.

 

3/ above 2 could be implemented in conjunction with an adaptation of the in-car module/decoder firmware so that motor current is set to zero for both throttle settings of 0 (dynamic braking) and 1 (non dynamic braking).

 

As back ground... the throttle vale increases from 0 to 63 as you press the throttle trigger...

 

I hope all of the above makes sense...

 

C

woodcote

766 posts

Hi Bob. You’re right that the cars can feel quite jerky and it’s not possible to get them to roll when you lift off the throttle.

 

While you’re waiting for a fix from Scalextric or a third-party modification, there are a couple of things to look at:

 

1) adjust your driving style. I ran an ARC Air layout at a public event recently. It was a smallish track and we used the Scalextric Mini Coopers with strong traction magnets. There was certainly zero roll! Our racers were all ages - novices, home racers and serious club racers - including a European Championship podium finisher. Most people took to the challenge, although those used to racing with no magnets and lots of roll took the longest to adjust. It’s a case of keeping the power in, so you are rarerly off the throttle, avoiding the dynamic braking and keep it smooth.

 

2) remove the traction magnets. A lot of people race with the car’s traction magnets removed. Although the dynamic braking still functions, it has much less effect without the magnetic downforce. It makes the cars more like classic 1970s & 80s cars. With the modern chassis, removing the magnets means cutting one of the tabs that hold it in - so it’s not temporary (although they could be glued back). Running non-magnet means using the Scalextric borders and barriers because the cars will drift more, plus you’ll need to look at a few tuning techiques, like truing tyres. There are some excellent tips here: https://www.scalextric.com/uk-en/five-top-tuning-tip-for-christmas

 

When I started racing digital, the guy who invited us to his house set up different sets of six cars, some sets with magnets, some not, some low and sleek, some tall and top-heavy. It gave us very different car characteristics and different racing challenges, although the fundamental digital skills of overtaking and pit stop strategy stayed the same.

 

P.S. There is an alternative controller to use with ARC - the Slot.it SCP2 with Oxigen module. These retail for £140 each (although I have seen them for just over £100). I have not used these with ARC, so they may also have the automatic dynamic braking issue when used with the ARC Pro power base.

Cmokem

6 posts

Thanks for the response.  I decided to come up with plan #4 with this controller.  After taking the controller apart and removing the trigger I drilled and tapped a hole for a Nylon setscrew (A).  The setscrew bottoms against the trigger stop (B), so I adjusted the set screw to move the trigger until the lights on the car came on and the motor just started to hum a bit.  Took the car for a test drive and was almost 2 seconds faster on my track just by having the car roll out instead of a hard brake that I was experiencing.  When I want the car to stop quickly...I just hit the ol brake button.  This works really well.  "C" show a place when I cut a hole in the controller to adjust the setscrew if need be.

 

Cheers!!

Bob 

Andy P.

1635 posts


Community Moderator

Intersting....!

Dr_C

288 posts

Nice mechanical imlementation of the approach of holding throttle at a preset value of 1 or greater to avoid a zero reading triggering the dynamc braking. Also, great that you see improved lap times... so a real case for needing to be able to turn off dynamic braking. I like the simplicity of this modification... i.e. requiring only a screwdriver, drill, thread cutter and nylon bolt... brilliant!

I guess the only benefit of using an additional resistor instead of the nylon bolt is that a switch could be fitted in parallel with the resistor thereby enabling easily switching off and on of the dynamic braking function. That said, I really like your implementation and your great lap time results :)

 

C

gorp

608 posts

Cool.

Never even noticed stock digital handling being a problem.

People have always complained before about digital toys always rolling on analog but just learned how to use it when racing old style.

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