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Woodcote

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woodcote

730 posts

Hi WWH - welcome back.

 

I think what you're looking for is Stage 3A in the ARC Pro Quick Start Guide - Connect Controllers. That's on pages 8 and 9. If you follow the steps carefully, that should work for you. Basically, you can connect any controller to any of the six colours. The cords on the controller are there to help you remember which colour you have connected them to. If you don't have all six coloured cords in the set (or with the extra controllers), you could use some sticky tape or some ribbon to do the job.

 

And if you can't find your Quick Start Guide, you can download a pdf version from towards the bottom of this page: https://www.scalextric.com/uk-en/shop/sets/app-race-control-arc/arc-pro.html

 

I hope that helps.

woodcote

730 posts

Hi MrsKat - welcome to the forum!

 

It does sound like you've gone through all the necessary trouble-shooting steps and it is quite perplexing for me too...

 

Perhaps one last thing to try is to remove the power track from the layout and use just that one piece for testing. Check again that both controllers and both cars work on lane two. And then try them on lane one.

 

If both cars and both controllers now work on both lanes, then I would guess there is a short circuit on one of the other pieces of track - possibly a small piece of metal or braid stuck in the slot. Fortunately there aren't many track pieces in the Endurance set, so it won't take long to give them a good inspection, hold them up-side-down, use a soft brush (eg a cheap foundation make-up brush) to clean out the slots and give them a good puff. Then build the circuit and try the two lanes again.

 

If using just the power straight doesn't solve the lane one problem, it's possible there might be a short in the slot on the power straight, which can be cleared in the same way as above - up-side-down, brush, blow... If that doesn't work, I'd say the powerbase is faulty and to contact Scalextric Customer Services (details either to the right or below).

 

Good luck!

woodcote

730 posts

Hi Retyred - welcome to the forum!

 

Of the current cars, the only ones that come already converted to digital from the factory are the ones in the ARC Pro sets. Otherwise, it's a case of adding a C8515 digital plug to DPR cars (or C8516 for F1 DPR cars) or soldering in the C7005 Retro-fit chip to non-DPR cars.

 

Having said that, a few retailers do sell cars already fitted with a chip (usually the C8515 or C8516) for a price slightly less than the combined cost of DPR car + chip. One retailer I have used that does this is Jadlam Toys & Models. They also sell the cars from the digital sets.

 

When I was building up my digital fleet, I would look out for discount codes and sales and stock up on chips. £16 is the RRP, but I've rarely paid more than £13. However, I avoid buying used chips or older chips from auction sites - the latest versions are best. I do also move the digital plugs around my cars - not all are chipped all the time, just the ones I am racing. It helps keep the cost down a little.

 

I hope that helps.

woodcote

730 posts

@Muttley

Back in my younger days we used to take the magnets out of the cars so they would slide more around corners etc. Was a lot of fun and quite challenging.Is this helpful/advisable?

That’s quite a thing now - replacing traction magnets with similarly-shaped brass weights. There are manufacturers who produce their own brass-weighted cars: the BSRT G-Jet, the Wizzard Thunderstorm, several Slottech brass cars and the new Viper V-Jet. Brass weights are also manufactured for the Tyco 440x2 and Tomy Turbo. All of them are fun to drive, but may need the power turned down to 12 or 15 volts.

 

With cars like the Micro Scalextric or Tony Mega-G+ you can remove the small neodymium traction magnets and then fill the magnet pockets with tungsten putty (anglers use this to weight their fishing lines). Although not as effective as the brass weights on the ‘pro’ cars, you do get a car - at 12 volts - that is fun to drive with plenty of sliding action. With the Micro Scalextric cars, it is worth using the older steel pin guide rather than the modern plastic flag - the pin allows the car to drift more predictably.

woodcote

730 posts

Hi Haybaler - welcome to the forum.

 

For analogue, you need one controller paired with red and another paired with green. Those are the only two pairings that will work with analogue mode - green with the inside lane and red with the outside. Sounds like you did that, but it’s worth checking again.

woodcote

730 posts

Hi Dirk - welcome to the forum!

 

It sounds like the installation of the Scalextric chip was fine and the problem only happened when you changed the guide blade. If the car is now not working at all, I suspect that in fitting the new (red) guide blade you have trapped some of the braid under the guide or dislodged the upper (solid metal) part of the braid assembly. That might mean there is a poor connection with the track or there is a short (the braid on each side of the guide is touching). I would expect a short to trigger a power overload on the powerbase and it is possible the chip has been damaged - but we can hope not...

 

The first thing I would do is remove the guide, ensure the solid part of the braid assembly is correctly fitted and that the braids are pulled aside before you re-attach the guide blade. Check and double check there are no strands of braid trapped under the guide blade. Bend the braids down a little for a good connection and, finally, check the braids are not touching each other out the back of the guide. Fingers-crossed that now works...

woodcote

730 posts

Hi Joe - welcome to the forum!

 

Sounds like you’ve done some excellent trouble-shooting already. From your detailed description, I’d suggest looking underneath the car at the back. There is a ‘blister’ on the bottom of the chassis/underpan that covers the crown gear (the big gear on the axle). Sometimes this can sit too low and catches on the track, effectively lifting the rear wheels off the track - giving the wheelspin you describe. The remedy is to sand or shave down the blister - either with a file, sandpaper or a scalpel. If you get it flat to the bottom of the underpan, the problem should be resolved.

 

One other thing that can cause a car to feel ’choppy’ is that the braid plate is not 100% aligned properly on the guide. The plate can shift forward a little causing poor connectivity and characteristic ‘choppiness’. Have a play with the plate, so how it is removed and re-fitted and then ensure it is pushed back so it sits firmly in the notch in the guide and covers the round base of the guide assembly. Sometimes the guide plate is not fitted properly at the factory and it can also become dislodged after a heavy crash.

 

I hope that fixes the Falcon for you!

woodcote

730 posts

To answer your question: that design shows me two right-hand pit entry pieces end to end at the bottom right of the picture. Pit out are the corresponding pit exit (fixed-flipper) pieces. So you need two C7015 right-hand pit lanes for that design.

 

Is it a good design for ARC Pro racing? In my opinion, no. The two pit entries are too close, the five straight lane changers are unnecessary (and too close) and the entire pit lane will take up fourteen feet - plus extra straights and corners each end. So it will require a table around twenty feet long. Also, five unnecessary lane changers plus an unnecessary pit lane set = $350+ for something that won’t add anything positive to your racing.

 

My advice would be to save the $350, use what you already have in the set, add some length (using C7016 single lane half straights) so you have around 3-4 feet of pit lane and see if that is sufficient when you are racing. If you decide a double pit lane is absolutely necessary, you’ll need an extra pit lane track (the same as you have in the set). To be able to choose whether to change lane a second time - you’ll want to see which lane is empty and decide which lane to choose - you’ll also need extra distance and thinking time, perhaps an extra 3-4 feet between pit entry 1 and pit entry 2. If that makes sense?

woodcote

730 posts

As I said earlier...

Although that pit lane does look very neat and allows each car to stop outside its own pit stall, I think you are right that functionality might be a problem - especially if you stop on a dead spot on a lane changer or miss a sensor. I do like a two-lane pit lane as it gives you the option to avoid a slow-pitting car in front of you. But not all those lane changers!

Similarly with those two lane changers on the main track - I wouldn't place two lane changers (a pit in and a straight lane changer) so close together. You run the risk of catching the wrong one or missing them both - and that is frustrating and poor design.

 

I would say there is a compromise with digital. Lane changing and pit lanes does give the potential for a very realistic set-up - you could say 'prototypical' if you were a model railroader. If you drive slowly and take care on lane changers, you can mimic a real-life race track like you would with a model railroad layout. That's where that pit lane fits in...

 

However - and it's a very big 'however' - if slot cars are about driving fast and racing each other, I'd want my layout design to be 100% functional for racing. So 'racing line' out-to-in curved lane changers become a corner-tightening hazard to avoid. And pit lanes like that in the book become impossible to use. Ultimately, you only find out what works and what doesn't by using various pieces in different ways. I'd start simple and add more lane changers only where you find you need them. Focus on having fun and enjoying exciting racing. The only right way to build a track is what provides the most fun for you and your racing pals.

 

Two lines of cars in the pits can help if you are racing with three or more people with ARC Pro (when you will be pitting at more or less the same time) - but only if you have the room. Otherwise a single-lane pit lane that holds six cars is perfectly sufficient - it will mean you can get stuck behind a slowly-pitting car, but that becomes part of the game-play and can be avoided by pitting early or pitting at the last moment. In other words, a simpler pit lane might add to the strategy and excitement!

woodcote

730 posts

Okay - so the pic on page 27 of Slot Car Racing in the Digital Age. The photo is cropped so you don’t actually see the original pit-in or the  final pit-out. The six single lane pieces will be needed alongside those two pit pieces which are 3 x half straights in length.

 

Although that pit lane does look very neat and allows each car to stop outside its own pit stall, I think you are right that functionality might be a problem - especially if you stop on a dead spot on a lane changer or miss a sensor. I do like a two-lane pit lane as it gives you the option to avoid a slow-pitting car in front of you. But not all those lane changers!

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